Based upon Annex D to the March 1995, IGC Agenda
Re-typed and re-numbered July 2002
Courtesy of Tor Johannssen

TROPHIES FOR WORLD GLIDING CHAMPIONSHIPS

  1. The Robert Kronfeld Challenge Cup
  2. The Kees Musters Speed Award
  3. The FAI Challenge Cups
  4. The World Soaring Cup

1. The Robert Kronfeld Challenge Cup

1.1 History
The Robert Kronfeld Challenge Cup was donated in 1969 by the government of Austria in memory of the Austrian glider pilot Robert Kronfeld, who was the first in the world to fly more than 100 km in a glider. This flight took place in 1929 along the Teutoburger Wald in Germany. The Cup was first awarded at the World Gliding Championships in Wiener Neustadt, Austria.

1.2 Rules
1.2.1 The Cup shall be awarded to the pilot who flies the greatest task distance in the World Championships concerned
1.2.2 If the greatest distance is flown by more than one pilot, the trophy is awarded to the pilot with the highest speed. Outlandings are valid.
1.2.3 If two or more pilots tie according to rules 1.2.1 and 1.2.2, the one among them with the earliest outlanding or finish time will be the winner.

1.3 Description
The cup is a crystal globe mounted upon a round crystal pillar on a heavy metal base.

1.4 Administration
1.4.1 The winner shall keep the Cup until the next World Gliding Championships
1.4.2 It is the responsibility of the last winner of the Cup to have it delivered before the next World Gliding Championships to the organizers of that event.

1.5 Engraving
The WGC organizers shall have the winner's name, the year and place of the World Gliding Championships engraved on a metal plate which is then glued to the footing of the Cup.

1.6 Change of Rules
If the structure of the World Gliding Championships changes to such a degree that the present rules no longer apply, the IGC shall change the rules only after consultation with the gliding section of the Austrian Aero Club


2 The Kees Musters Speed Award

2.1 History
The Kees Musters Speed Awards was initiated in 1988 by individual members of the Soaring Society of America (SSA) in memory of former World Soaring Champion Kees Musters of the Netherlands. Funding for the award came from donations from soaring pilots around the world.

2.2 Rules
The award is given permanently to the pilot achieving the fastest daily speed in the 15m Class at the World Gliding Championships. Should there be a tie, it shall be resolved between the tieing pilots in favor of the one who achieved the second (or third, etc. in case of continuing tie) fastest daily speed, compared to the other tieing second (of third, etc.) pilot(s).

2.3 Description
The award consists of a oak wood plaque with lucite over a photo of a 15m class glider with a brass plate with engraving.

2.4 Administration
The plaque shall be sent by SSA to the organizers of each 15m World Gliding Championships for delivery prior to the end of the competition. The organisers are responsible for the engraving.

2.5 Engraving
The inscription entered on the brass plate shall be in Footlight MT Light or similar font in the following style:

THE KEES MUSTERS TROPHY
Award to
BIRGER BULUKIN, NORWAY, LS-6, 137,77 KM/H
For Achieving The Fastest Daily Speed In The 15 Meter Class At
The World Gliding Championships
June 1993, Borlänge, Sweden

2.6 Change of rules
If IGC discontinues 15m World Championships, SSA shall determine, with the advice of IGC, how the award shall be made. If SSA shall be terminated, the funds shall be distributed as determined by the directors of SSA, with the advice of IGC. If IGC or its successor shall be terminated, the SSA directors shall determine how the funds shall be administered.


3 The FAI Challenge Cups

3.1 History
3.1.1 The FAI Open Class Challenge Cup was donated in 1948 and was first awarded to the winner of the 1948 World Gliding Championships in Samaden, Switzerland. From 1952 until 1956 it was the first prize in the Single Seater Class. In 1956 it was changed to the Open Class.
3.1.2 The FAI 15 m Challenge Cup was donated in 1981 by the goldsmith and glider pilot Heinrich Schönke of Bünde, Germany. It was first awarded retroactively to the winner of the 15 m Class in the 1978 World Gliding Championships in Chateauroux, France.
3.1.3 The FAI Standard Class Challenge Cup was donated in 1952 by the Royal Aero Club of Spain. It was first awarded to the winner of the Two-seater Class in the World Gliding Championships near Madrid, Spain. When the Two-seater Class was replaced by the Standard Class in 1958, the Cup was transferred to that class.

3.2 Rules
The FAI Challenge Cups are awarded to the winner of each of the three mentionned classes in the World Gliding Championships.

3.3 Description
3.3.1 The FAI Open Class Challenge Cup is a 32 cm high silver cup mounted upon a green marble foot forming a two-layer octagon.
3.3.2 The FAI 15 m Class Challenge Cup is a 31 cm high silver cup with a round wooden base. Circling the low, narrow waist of the cup is a band of silver oak leaves mounted on a wooden ring.
3.3.3 The FAI Standard Class Challenge Cup is a 52 cm high classic two handle silver trophy on a wooden base.

3.4 Administration
The FAI Challenge Cups shall be kept by the winners until the next World Gliding Championships and shall be returned before the start of the championships to the organizers of this event. The organizers are responsible for the engraving.

3.5 Engraving
The engraving shall include the name of the winner and the year of the event. The place of the event and the country of the winner shall also be engraved if this has been done before.

3.6 Change of Rules
If any of the classes is discontinued as a World Championship class, the IGC shall decide how the cup shall be awarded in the future.


4 The World Soaring Cup

4.1 History
The World Soaring Cup was donated in 1995 by nine New Zealand gliding families and was first awarded in the World Gliding Championship in Omarama, New Zealand.

4.2 Rules
4.2.1 The World Soaring Cup is awarded to the team scoring the highest number of points according to these rules.
4.2.2 An eligible pilot shall be one competing in the World Gliding Championships in a class of at least ten competitors representing at least five NACs. Every eligible pilot shall be a member of a Team representing his or her NAS and this Team shall compete for the World Soaring Cup.
4.2.3 Scoring
4.2.3.1 The maximum points in each class is to be 1000. No Day Factor is to be applied.
4.2.3.2 Team points for each championship day (Pt) will be determined by dividing the total numbers of points gained by the Team (Sum of Pn) divided by the number of team pilots having had a competition launch on the day (nt).

Pt = ( Sum of Pn) / nt
4.2.3.3 The winning Team is the team with the highest total score, obtained by adding the team points for each competition day.

4.3 Description
The World Soaring Cup is a bronze globe of about 25 cm diameter inside a bronze "thermal" spiraling up and around the globe, which has New Zealand prominently displayed, all on a wooden base.

4.4 Administration
4.4.1 The World Soaring Cup shall be held by the NAC of the winning team until the next World Gliding Championships and shall be returned before the start of the championships to the organizers of this event, who are responsible for the engraving.
4.4.2 If the Cup is not competed for at a subsequent World Championships it is to be returned to Gliding New Zealand, Wellington, New Zealand, at the expense of the holders.

4.5 Engraving
The engraving shall be done on the metal plaques around the socket and shall state the winning team's country, the year and the venue.

4.6 Change of rules
The rules for the World Soaring Cup may be changed by IGC only after consultation with the donors and Gliding New Zealand.


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